Posted in Uncategorized

The Need

photo-1451481454041-104482d8e284Here in the United States, we tend to take children for granted. In the church, we tend to take children’s ministry for granted. But in the Republic of Georgia, children’s ministry barely exists. Most churches don’t have anything for the kids, so kids don’t bother to come to church. Which of course means that someone has to stay home with them. So you can see how this can have a wide effect on the growth of a church.

But more pervasive than that, the leadership has realized that they need to prioritize children for an entirely different reason – because children really are the heart of the country. You know the saying “it takes a village to raise a child”? Well, in the nation of Georgia, that is how they actually live. They don’t have issues like child abduction or child abuse. Children are too precious to ever allow such a thing to become permissive.

Life in Georgia really does focus on the family. Families work together, they live together, they depend on each other for everything. So what better way to share the love of Jesus than to reach all of the family?

Author:

Born and raised in a Christian home, I felt God calling me to work overseas with children when I was only 11 years old. I graduated from Evangel University in Springfield, MO, and fully intended on serving two to three years in my hometown of Phoenix, then head overseas. But God had other plans. Two years into it, both of my parents began having health problems that continued for over 8 years. Twelve years after my graduation, my parents' health was restored and my student debt was finally paid off. Now, with 14 years of ministry (12 dedicated to ministry to children) under my belt, I am now fulfilling that calling God wrote on my heart at the age of 11. In Telavi, the Republic of Georgia, I am truly living my dream. God is doing some great things here, and I am so thrilled to be apart of it.

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